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Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Kylie gets body clipped


Since winter-coat growth is governed by daylight and not temperature, horses will still grow a thicker coat when the days get shorter even if it is one hundred degrees out. I tried explaining this to Kylie, but she grew a thick woolly coat anyway. Her coat grew so thick already she was ready for a snowstorm. This will be the first of several body clips this winter. Luckily Mazzy's coat is still short and slick. She must have listened to my lecture, but I am sure the fur is coming soon.


Reasons for clipping: People clip their horses' coats to make them more comfortable when in work as it helps to stop them from overheating. Horses dry off much quicker without a long coat to trap the sweat. It is way easier to keep a short coat clean. Their skin will stay cleaner and healthier. They won't take long to groom so you'll have more time in the saddle. They'll be happier working for you, especially on warmer days. Plus, a heavy coat looks unkempt. When I first moved to CA from the east coast I thought the whole clipping blanketing regimens of southern California was bizarre. I was amazed that the horses grew the same fluffy coat that horses in much colder climates get even though it does not get nearly as cold. Sixty is cold here. Also, horses get both sheets and blankets at night in the "winter" when it is cold. I guess they get acclimated to what is cold for the area?


Tips: have your clippers professionally sharpened before every body clip. Sharp clippers cut down on clipper tracks and help prevent the dreaded "corduroy horse." Another trick to a nice clip job is to give your horse a bath before and they spray with Show Sheen which makes the clippers glide through the hair. Dirt inside his coat will catch in the clipper teeth and cause the blades to drag and cut unevenly. Also, the dirt will dull the clippers more quickly, possibly requiring you to interrupt the job to sharpen your blades. Wet hair will also dull the blades as well as be close to impossible to clip.

Kylie is very well behaved and used to being body clipped. She stands perfectly patient, and probably likes the attention. She likes anything that makes her look prettier. I love the way a freshly clipped horse feels. Luckily grey horses coats don't turn funky colors after being clipped. Some chestnuts turn a horrible shade of orange. After she gets clipped her coat is so shiny and slick!

6 comments:

fernvalley01 said...

Never thought about that with where you live ! my group get thick wooly coats , but here they need them!

Desert Rose said...

Ah yes...the winter body clip! it does seem stange but last year is the 2st time I did NOT clip Jesse. Just kept a day sheet on him and he stayed clean. Still have not decided about this year???

allhorsestuff said...

Thanks Tara...you cleared some issues up for me...I will be clipping too soon.These handy facts will mkae it go much better..love the show sheen tip~ I did not know that about the light and not the temp!

Your grey looks nice..Wa is a dark greyish under her Mahogany bay coat.
Kac

Julia said...

This I AM DREADING...I will procrastinate as long as feasible!!!!

Five O'Clock Somewhere said...

Body clipping is for sure a dreaded task. All that itchy hair gets EVERYWHERE!

Erin said...

Thanks for the info! I am also in California...Los Angeles. My new 2yr old Friesian stallion will be arriving in a week or so, and is already quite the fuzzybutt. Which months throughout the year specifically do you clip your horse? How often? I'm wondering if I should have him clipped when he arrives and blanket at night, or just leave him be...

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